Superpowers

“ahhh burrr (Sam’s favourite word currently), so sleepy”, said Sam. His eyelids felt as heavy as a boob waiting to be suckled. He was at grandma’s waiting for Mummy and Daddy to come pick him up.

IMG_9545.JPG  IMG_8074.JPG

“just… one more…taste…my…yummy hands” but Sam unknowingly drifts off on a daring adventure, complete with all-you-can-drink milk bars (boobs), dodging crazy huge adult faces, and oversized, intruding extremities.

IMG_9595.JPG

BANG! a sudden, loud sound (usually a cough or sneeze) startles Sam awake. Light slowly fills his eyes as he squints to focus on an unfamiliar place. “keh keh, ahhh guuurrr, where am i?” he wonders aloud to himself.

“Sammmm, you’re at home!” cooed Mummy.

“but but… how!?” said Sam, perplexed.

“Could it really be? I have super powers!? One moment i was at grandma’s, and the next, here, at home!” Sam’s thoughts went wild. “now, if i close my eyes for a bit longer, i’ll end up back at grandma’s!”

10 hours later, Sam the teleporter, is back at grandma’s… sucking on his hands. but that is a story for another day.

 

 

Advertisements

77 Days later

IMG_7281.JPG

It’s been 77 days of priceless learning, un-learning and re-learning. With all that learning, let’s go through some idioms today:

Don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater

Yes, we have come to learn that this is really good advice. It is also really hard to send a baby flying out of the tub (made of metal in times past), water and all. Well, unless you are really strong, we’re not sure how this is possible. The poor fella that first did it, or was the victim of it…

Crying over spilt milk

This has happened to us on a number of occasions. especially when the bottle, full of expressed milk, decides to come loose on a whim, ponding its contents on the floor.

1) we have to clean the mess up, 2) it was hard work producing all that milk, 3) the baby really is crying while we scramble to warm up the milk in the fridge.

crying over spilt milk – justified.

Like taking candy from a baby

Well firstly, babies don’t eat candy nor should they be holding on to any (choking hazard). Not advisable to give your baby solids too soon either. Secondly, if you’re a parent trying to take something (like candy) from a baby, it might not be that easy, given how hard it is to pry open their fingers.

Be left holding the baby

ohhh wow, this is a tough one. Holding the baby is enjoyable on most accounts, except…

(a) when he is screaming his head off wanting milk

(b) he is dripping with vomit

(c) is dripping with pee

(d) and ewwww… dripping with poo

at which time you will quickly put the baby down. We wonder what happened to the first person that experienced this – must have felt an awful sense abandonment.

Sleep like a baby

This is the pinnacle of sleep for both parents and child. How a baby gets to this state is irrelevant once if the baby is in this state.

1k4ktf.gif

What are some idioms that you experienced?

Night Safari

It’s been hard to put Sam to sleep recently. Some nights we struggle to put him to bed from dinner time at 7, till close to midnight. Our routine goes something like: cry, pick up, rock till sleepy, put down, cry, repeat. some cycles are interspersed with milk bottle, and / or a diaper refreshment exercise.

On really rare occasions (i write this in hope), it may involve a full body wipe down or bath (details have been left out to protect our younger readers).

Most nights, our house becomes the night safari. This is where we, the exhibits, perform musicals, lion dance routines, and some rhythmic gymnastics (floor exercises to be exact) in the dark.

giphy (1).gif

but still…the wide eyed creature keeps staring at you in the dark, complete with dilated pupils and untiring eyelids.

We’d like to believe that we have developed enhanced low light visual acuity, to see where we are going in a completely dark environment. Actually we found something that helps when moving from a bright living room to a dark bedroom: using red light (much like how red light is used in submarines or air traffic control rooms at night). It helps our eyes adjust quicker to the low light conditions, and allows us to read the manual that comes with the baby (hah!). More on the Purkinje Effect here!

 

 

 

Sometimes, despite our best efforts, a little cough or the closing of doors startles him awake.

e7c7a80f31190f58c4d310223d36f477.jpeg

 

Sam the Caterpillar

This is a story about Sam, the 6 week old caterpillar.

IMG_8613.JPG

Sam has been growing well and has put on more than 1 whole kilo since he hatched. Some might call him a fatter-pillar. He recently went through a metamorphosis of sorts, from a quiet little bug, to a loud, shouty kind of bug.

The parental bugs have had much trouble settling him into bed. You see, Sam the caterpillar has learnt a new skill, one that makes strategic use of his hands. While being rocked to the point of drowsiness, Sam will sneakily grab onto parental bugs’ outer wear (also known as clothing) and not let go.

And when it comes time to lay Sam’s sleepy head down onto the bed, he wakes up when he loses his grip of the parental bugs’ outerwear.

IMG_8690.JPG

Oh, poor parental bugs, they have to put Sam the caterpillar back to sleep (to the point of drowsiness) again.

Most other times, Sam the caterpillar has aspirations to become a butterfly, often staring at bright lights on the ceiling. He has also been observed squirming out of his exo-skeleton to free his… hands!

One day, when Sam the caterpillar becomes an independent butterfly, these stories will follow him (and his wife). But that’s another story for another day.